Anguilla Open Golf Tournament

Maybe it’s not as famous as “The Open,” the golf tournament that is so fabled that it doesn’t even need to say which “Open” it is. But ours is still a national championship.

And how often do you get a chance to win one of those?

C’mon down and enter the 3rd Annual Anguilla Open, June 27th to 29th, 2014. The first-ever Anguilla Open was one by local “laddie” (as they say in Scotland), Theron Loizos, owner and chef of Picante Restaurant. A scratch golfer, he’s the odds-on favorite to win it back this year.

Here is the planned schedule…

Practice Round Friday, Round One Saturday and Round Two Sunday
Entry Fee, Tee Gift and Beverage Cart
Continental Breakfast at Café Med during stay
Opening Reception at Clubhouse
Lunch Saturday & Sunday
Awards Reception Sunday

36-Hole Stroke Play
Championship Flight, Men’s Flight (10 to 24 handicap),
Senior Flight (50 to 64), Super Senior Flight (65 and over) & Ladies Flight

Rate for Stay and Play (Two Nights – $915, Three Nights – $1165, & Four Nights – $1415)
Rate for Play-only ($415)

NOTE: Stay & Play Rates are based on double occupancy in a Beachfront Junior Suite for one golfer. For additional golfer sharing accommodations, please add $415.00 to package rates above. Maximum 2 people per room. Package Rates include 10% Government Tax, 10% Service Charge, and $1.00 per adult per night Government Marketing Levy.

Download this PDF for more information, including sponsorships.

Or contact Ryan Bowey, PGA pro, directly at…
phone: 264.498.5602
email: rbowey@cuisinart.ai)

Morlens School of Music Community Recital Series

If you are on-island during the weekend of April 5-6, and if you’d like to see a truly outstanding local event, don’t miss the Morlens School of Music Community Recital Series. It continues on Sunday April 6, 2014 when trombonist Leon Christie takes the stage at the St. Augustine’s Anglican Church.

Leon is a 5th Form student at the ALHCS. He has blossomed into a fluent, confident musician and is looking forward to his first solo performance. He is also an excellent steel pannist and a proficient bassist, talents which will also be on display at the much anticipated event.

The Morlens Community Series commenced in February of 2013 and has placed several young talents on stage during the year to rave reviews from appreciative audiences. Violinist/saxophonist Remieko Richards will follow Christie in the month of May.

Now a word from those who organize these tremendous events…

“The management of the Morlens School wishes to express gratitude to all who have been unwavering in the support of our local musical youth and generous in their donations toward the Series’ beneficiaries – the Blossom Centre and the ALHCS concert band.”

Put this on your calendar and let them know how you loved it, or ask if you have questions, at their Facebook page.

Morlens School of Music Recital with Leon Christie

Moonsplash 2014, See You There!

March 14-16, the countdown to Moonsplash begins!

For those new to this island-splash of music and merriment by the moon and the sea, here’s the info you need to know. If you’re back for your umpteenth party check out…

Here’s what’s happening, in one exciting musical nutshell (click on image for full-size graph in new browser tab or window)…

Moonsplash 2014 events

See you there!

Straw Hat Serving Lionfish!

Straw Hat has figured out a way to “kill 2 fish with one stone.” Here’s their story, as reported by good friend Peter Parles…

“About a year ago we were visited by the Environmental Health Department (EHD) and the Department of Fisheries (DoF) and asked to take a short survey about lionfish, the invasive species that have been multiplying in great numbers and are causing real problems for the fish supply in our local waters. We spoke at length with these government departments and realized that there was a real commitment to do something about trying to control the proliferation of these pests before it became a bigger problem.

As SCUBA divers, Anne and I have been on many dives where the dive master has spent much of our bottom time shooting lionfish and the numbers have increased each time we have been diving. The survey was presented to restaurants in Anguilla and was basically asking about our knowledge of the fish, the problems they are causing and whether we would be willing to use them in the restaurant.

Two weeks ago I received an email from the Anguilla Hotel & tourism Association alerting us of a lionfish seminar that was being presented by the EHD in cooperation with Fadilah Ali, a PhD student from the University of Southampton who is working on her thesis entitled The Lionfish Invasion in the Southern Caribbean. Chef Nick and I spoke about the seminar and Nick attended this past Wednesday.

He came back very excited and started calling fishermen immediately and, we are proud to announce, we served our first lionfish special last night! Everyone who tried it loved it (including Straw Hat staff who were initially afraid to try it at all).”

For more information about lionfish (what they are, how they became a problem, how they taste and what we can do about the problem), click here.

Now let’s hear Nick’s thoughts, starting you off with some yummy pics…

lionfish anguilla

“Lionfish!!

This week I had a unique opportunity to start working with Lionfish. Last night was the first time we served it at Straw Hat and the response was amazing. Despite the myths of the Lionfish being “poisonous,” with a little education it is quite delicious and not terribly difficult to work with.

This past Wednesday I was able to attend a class sponsored by the Ministry of Environment and the Department of Fisheries where I was supplied with a wealth of knowledge on this fish. It is a big issue that is growing very quickly.

Lionfish are unique in many ways, one being the way they reproduce. Female Lionfish can lay up to fifteen thousand eggs every three to four days. They’re gluttons too, swallowing little fish whole with no regard to any other hungry fish around them.

They don’t get full either, and in fact will use the binge and purge tactic to keep eating! They are excellent hunters with bilateral swim valves so they can essentially go side to side to catch even more prey.

So what eats Lionfish?? WE DO!! (that’s about it). There are some species of fish in the Indo-Pacific that have been observed preying on lionfish but ultimately most fish will only eat them if they are wounded.

So we have this rapidly reproducing, overeating beast in the sea around us that will take over if we don’t do something about it! So we’ve started.

Last night I cleaned about forty pounds of the fish and will do another forty for tonight. The meat is lovely, a mix between the texture of a small grouper and the sweetness of a red snapper.

The fillets are a nice size and the overall process of cleaning them is not that difficult. It takes a little patience and time, but at this point it is very necessary.

They are as versatile as a snapper. You can fry them whole, bread the filets, steam or grill them. A diving buddy told me of a lionfish pizza he had!

I encourage all of our guests to give it a try. I promise you won’t be disappointed. I encourage our colleagues to do the same and if you need a hand or a little assistance in using the fish, feel free to come by for a demo.

Thank you Peter and Ann for starting the ball rolling on this.”

To everyone at Straw Hat… great job! If the lion is the “king of the beasts,” this species sounds like the “king of the reef fish.”

When Nori gets back from New York, we intend to sample “the king”… sounds delicious!

Let’s eat our way out of this problem!

Pack for a Purpose and Franginpani Join to Help Blowing Point Youth Development Center

Here is a cause that deserves your support. It is a collaboration between Frangipani Beach Resort and Pack For a Purpose. The goal is to help the Blowing Point Youth Development Center.

Pack for a Purpose makes big impacts on the lives of children around the world. It does that with the help of travelers.

How?

Use the available space in your luggage to provide needed supplies. For example, 5 pounds (2.27 kilos) delivers…

  • 400 pencils
  • 5 deflated soccer balls with an inflation device
  • A stethoscope, a blood pressure cuff and 500 band-aids

What you bring with you helps the Blowing Point Youth Development Center (BPYDC) to provide after school programs for children, a service that is much-needed in Anguilla.

It bridges the gap between school and home for Anguilla’s youngsters. Staff and volunteers support and guide them, both in academics and life.

The BPYDC depends on the generosity of donors in Anguilla and abroad. Blowing Point was the first location for this type of program. There are now similar ones in the East End (H.O.P.E. Center) and in Island Harbour (Care Center), which Frangipani also hopes to help.

Here’s how the program works…

Visitors to Anguilla donate supplies based what the Center needs. You literally “pack for a purpose.” Simply bring necessary supplies to the hotel.

Click here for Blowing Point’s needs list. Pack what you can and drop it off at Frangipani. They will take it from there.

Pack for a Purpose works like this with hotels and resorts worldwide.. It has been awarded the Global Vision Award by Travel & Leisure. And it is a certified 501(c)(3), so all donations are tax-deductible for American travelers.

For more info, please contact Shannon Kircher at Frangipani Beach Resort (264-497-6442) or by email ( shannon.kircher@frangipaniresort.com ).